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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
interest and openness to putting in place a deal, both from president obama and leader boehner, and a number of members of congress. >> an aide to senator majority leader harry reid told fox news, the democrats are open to various tax loopholes only if the republicans agree first to raise taxes on those making $250,000 or higher. sound familiar, chris. >> does a bit. thanks from the white house. president obama won reelection on a promise to raise taxes on high earners as a plan to raise our massive debt. republicans say they agree with the goal, but want to do it a different way than the president. jim angle tonight on their alternative. >> president obama wants to take money from wealthy taxpayers, republicans say they're willing to raise revenues, but not tax rates. and that leaves ample middle ground that could satisfy both, putting a cap on the amount of deductions any one person could claim, such as $50,000. >> that means the maximum number of deductions you can take is $50,000, you can take it for anything you want, but you can't take more than 50,000. >> the tax policy
president obama and the four top congressional leaders john boehner, nancy pelosi, harry reid, mitch mcconnell all will begin talks at the white house. cnn's jill dougherty is following those developments for us this morning. she's in our washington, d.c. bureau. good morning, jill. >> hello, soledad. well, this is it. both sides are going to be there. they're looking at the tone. they're looking at the president, what kind of tone will he set? you have to say that they're coming in both sides with their essential positions intact. all, both sides are saying that there is some room for a compromise. so, the essential thing is how do you compromise? if you look at the positions, let's say, of the republicans, and it's most strongly, as i say, relayed by senator mitch mcconnell, he does not, and they do not, want any tax increases. so let's listen to him first. >> and let's be clear, an opening bid of $1.6 trillion of new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson-bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate, it's t
that we've seen since the election, whether it's from the president or the house speaker john boehner, but i can tell you in talking to sources privately on both sides of the aisle, they admit that it's all about positioning and posturing to make sure at the end of the day if we do go off the fiscal cliff that they're not blamed for it. they're the ones who looked reasonable, not unreasonable, and they're preparing for the other side to blame them for the opposite, if that makes sense. that's a lot of what you are saying in public. the reality is that neither side has a really clear machine date or clear vote and no one wants to look at the end of the day like they never gave compromise a chance. listen to republican bob corker, though, because there does seem to be a little bit of a crack on the republican side on whether or not it's okay to raise some taxes. >> i think there is a deal. the ying and yang is we know there has to be revenues, and i think -- look, i haven't met a wealthy republican or democrat in tennessee that's not willing to contribute more as long as they know we so
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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